Everest expedicio teljes felszereleslistajat keresem

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  • #43879 Hozzászólás

    Maszo

    A magyar Everest expedicio teljes felszereleslistajat keresem, mindent ami veluk volt, tipus, marka, hazilag-gyartott, stb. a zoknitol a kotelekig.

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  • #420239 Hozzászólás

    Pete

    Gear

    Partial Equipment list info:
    Here is a brief incomplete list for you. Minus the Climbing gear

    4-pairs socks

    6-underware

    2-pairs of shorts for the walk in

    3-pairs t-shirts for the walk in

    2-bandanas or a sun hat too keep off the sun

    Sunscreen, sunscreen, sunscreen plus zinc

    Good sturdy Hiking shoes

    1-sleeping bag (as warm as you can get)

    1-sleeping pad (your choice the more comfortable you are the better you sleep the more energy you will have) you can get a Crazy Creek chair that goes with your pad this is a good investment.

    2-expedition weight Patagonia long underwear tops (or 1 depends on how dirty you like to be)

    1-expedition weight Patagonia long underwear bottom

    1 lightweight fleese bottom

    1-heavy weight Patagonia or similar fleese jacket

    1-Gortex shell jacket

    1-Gortex shell pants (full length zippers)

    1-Down filled jacket liner from Feathered Friends of Seattle, (optional but I always end up using it)

    1-Downfilled Gortex guides Parka 1-Warm hat with ear flaps

    2-pair of heavy duty mittens (in case you lose one pair up high)

    1-pair fleese gloves 1-pair ski gloves

    1-pair of Koflach double plastic boots, One Sport (warmer)($$$) or Asolo (I prefer Koflach, I find them more comfortable)

    1-pair of gaitors

    1-pair ski poles

    1-ice axe

    1-pair of sharp crampons (test them on your boots before you leave and make sure they fit perfectly)

    1-headlamp with extra batteries

    1-cup with spoon attached

    1-Swissarmy knife

    1- stove of your choice (I use Markhill stormy hanging stone with Blueway cartridges, you will have get fuel in China or Nepal as it is difficult to fly over) allow at least 1 canister per day for up high per 2-man tent.

    3-tents one set up at base camp. One at camp3. and One for the south col.
    3-1-litre waterbottles with insulators (drink at least 5 litres a day to help acclimitise)
    Food….

    #420238 Hozzászólás

    Pete

    Gear

    Communication

    Satellite phone and Laptop

    Check extensive information on tech and satellite phones at the Human Edge Tech site. Click here.

    Power supply

    Solar panels work great on Everest. Just lay them out and hook up to a simple car battery and you will have more than enough power. We used 3 panels and filled our 210-amp battery in one day. Shop around at marine suppliers.

    You should buy the battery in Kathmandu and fill it in BC. If daily power is very important to you, bring a generator. Pick it up for a few hundred dollars in Kathmandu.
    Your trekking agency will help you find fuel.

    Connect your battery to an AC/DC converter (US 50 and up at your local electrical supplier or hardware store). Now you can plug in your TV and watch MTV India.

    No, really, you are in a national park. Use your generator only when absolutely necessary.

    More info on power and solar panels at the Human Edge Tech site.

    Walkie-talkies

    There are a number of brands around and new smaller units are constantly hitting the market. Choose a model with AA-batteries since charging high up is a problem. Lithium batteries are expensive but outstanding with respect to weight factor and cold tolerance. A Lithium battery will perform with almost no loss down to -20C/-30F.

    Every climber and summit sherpa should have his/her own set. There should also be a unit at C2 and of course in BC. Check the second hand market and/or last year’s expeditions for good deals.

    Using a base station will enhance your possibilities to communicate when it’s really important – in bad weather.

    ==========
    Climbing Equipment
    Ice Axe

    Straight shaft and light. That’s it. We use Camp but there are others around. You will keep the axe on your pack most of the time (until Lhotse Wall and summit).

    Rope

    We carry a light 15-meter glacier rope at all times. Most people don’t. We bring it for rescue or crossing unsafe places. Or in places of missing ladders and/or fixed ropes. We also tie in to each other if there are no fixed ropes at dangerous sections.

    =========
    Climbing gear

    Shoes

    Almost all climbers use Italian OneSport shoes today. The One Sport company has been aquired by Millet – boots still looks the same but the brand tag is different.

    Get them oversized (1-2 sizes). This is not your average weekend climbing trip and you need something where your toes have space to move freely, or you´ll get frostbite by rush delivery.

    HotTronics make great heating pads and wires that can be used in your boots on your summit attempt. Michael Strynoe rebuilt the battery packs to give more power at a lower weight using AA Lithium batteries.

    Crampons

    Camp makes the ultralight titanium crampons. They are light, but considered not durable. We took our chances with them and they never broke on us.

    Bring spares and carry one spare at the summit attempt. Secure them to the boots with steel wire if they keep falling of. There are however many brands of crampons around. Choose your favorites, remember only that ice climbing crampons differ from glacier crampons.

    Clothes

    You will need multi-layer clothing for climbing between BC and C3. The temperature changes dramatically when the clouds obscure the sun.

    One or two layers of lightweight Gore-Tex over fleece will work well, since the layers will be easy to shed or add. Carry a lightweight down jacket at all times. Use a cap to protect your head in the sun. Wear water-resistant gloves in the icefall and a good pair of down mittens higher up. Carry a spare mitten on your summit attempt.

    Use a heavy down suit for the summit. We wear it already from C2 on the summit attempt in order to save weight. If you choose to do that, move early in the morning or you´ll boil.

    We have used down suites from both Mountain Hardware and North Face and they all worked equally well. Check that the hood will work together with the oxygen mask, covering your face properly.
    If possible, bring a spare down suit for cold nights in BC. Bring plenty of lightweight socks to change.

    Face mask

    Use a heat-exchanging, wired face mask for protection against Khumbu- cough. Use the mask already from Gorak Shep. You´ll get used to it and be protected right from the start. You should find the mask in stores for cross-country skiing. If you don´t, check the gear link list on this web site. The Finnish manufacturer is listed there.

    Harness

    North Face makes a great no-nonsense harness. Remove the stuff that you don’t need. Tie about half a meter of line with a carabiner for the fixed ropes. Forget screw carabiners, you want them big and simple at Everest. Make a knot halfway up the rope and hook up a jumar with another carabiner. Secure the jumar in the front to your backpack straps or at chest level when not in use, this being the easiest way to get hold of it. Use a repelling device or just a carabiner if you know the technique.

    =========

    Food
    Spam. Spam. Spam! You will watch it turn into a strange pinkish shade on your frozen tin plate, put it down and shed another pound this week.

    The opposite of everything your doctor told you is on the other hand the good news on Everest diet! Bring all the fatty goodies, the important thing is that you really like them. Don’t experiment by bringing unfamiliar foods from home.

    The Morrocan cranberry compot could taste swell at a friends dinner party, on Everest however you tend to avoid new and eclectic taste sensations.

    Eat lots of the local vegetables (onions, cabbage, carrots). Really try to finish the heated can fruit that your BC-cook will offer you. It’s solluble fiber content is extremely effective against hemorrhoids and constipation. Garlic is excellent for altitude adaptation. It thins the blood. The sherpas eat it constantly and so should you. The smell? HAHA. You’re on Everest, pal. The garlic smell will be among the nicest snuff you’ll encounter.

    Hard salami, processed cheese, peanut butter, jam, tinned ham, some tinned meals, snacks, candy and chocolate – dream it all up and then bring it.

    Check expiry-dates for ready made sweet pies and other cakes and desserts. Many lasts surprisingly well and are excellent packs of calories (forget about the trans fats for this occasion only).

    For high camps; cup-a-soups, instant soups, dried cheese&ham tortellini (a hit), more chocolate, marzipan, hot chocolate powder, milk powder perhaps, some coffee and tea. Cereals and oatmeal for breakfast. Hiking powder meals are not mandatory – try instead instant “real” foods (rice/pasta casseroles, macaroni-cheese meals, “real” soups requiring a few added minutes to cook). If you don’t like it at home, you won’t like it better on the mountain. Make it as easy on you as you can by bringing foods you actually enjoy.

    On the climbs: Candy bars, nuts, crackers. Sports Bars and Sports Jelly. Sherpas eat boiled eggs on climbing. Bring them too – wrapped with some salt in a plastic bag – along with a piece of salami, cheese and bread.

    The more “real” food you eat at altitude the better you´ll perform. Anatolij Buchreew had raw carrots. The occasional canned tuna, salmon and sardines will be a treat. Tubed cheese. Powder Energy drinks.

    Bring yourself to eat. Extreme weight loss is a fact on Everest – just mere excisting at that altitude speeds your metabolism rate by 10%. Typically we lose around 10-20 lb. (5-10 kg), even if really stuffing ourselves.

    ========

    Transportation

    Transportation of alpine gear is expensive and really bureaucratic. Preferably, pack in large North Face soft packs or equivalent.

    Plastic barrels are convenient as well. The domestic airlines in Nepal are reluctant to fly the largest of those barrels, so choose the smaller sizes. Buy small padlocks for everything. On its way to BC, the luggage will at times be left unattended.

    Pack everything bearing in mind that it will be carried on Yaks. Ketchup will pierce, jam jars will leak, sugar end up in your underwear. Store everything tight and isolated in plastic bunks (tupperware style) if you don’t want to forever remember Everest by the smell of various food products.

    Potato chips should be Pringles, if not for the taste then for the hard case. All foods and technical gear will also face extreme temperatures, both hot and cold.

    Have your trekking agency to pick up your gear at the Kathmandu airport. Otherwise, you will lose your mind. The place is loaded with staff, their cousins and even more cousins, all more or less just hanging around but somehow all being involved with you.

    It’s “baksheesh” (tip) here and baksheesh there and still no action! You will be told to file papers and then to redo them all over again. And again.

    Leave it to your Trekking agency instead and have them to do the hassle at the airport for you.

    ========

    Climbing gear

    Below is a brief description of the gear that worked for us, but please remember that there are plenty of alternatives.

    Preparations

    All your gear needs to be tested in snow and cold before you arrive at Everest. Walk in your boots, sleep in your tent and try working with the gloves. If you are joining a commercial expedition a lot of stuff will be provided for you.

    Check carefully what they will bring and if it is solely for your use or meant to be shared with other climbers. Get it in writing.

    Shoes

    Almost all climbers use Italian OneSport shoes today. Get them oversized (1-2 sizes). This is not your average weekend climbing trip and you need something where your toes have space to move.

    HotTronics make some great heating pads that can be used on your summit attempt. Michael Strynoe rebuilt the battery packs to give more energy at a lower weight using AA Lithium batteries.

    Crampons

    Camp makes the ultralight titan ones. They are light but considered not so strong. We have never had one breaking on us yet though. Bring spares and carry one spare at summit attempt. Secure them to the boots with steel wire if they keep falling of. Again though, there are almost as many brands of crampons as climbers around.

    Clothes

    You will need multi-layer clothes for all climbing between BC and C3. The temperature changes dramatically when the sun hits the clouds, since the ground own heating power is much lower at altitude.

    One or two layers of lightweight Gore-Tex over fleece work well since they are easily removable. Always carry a light down jacket too. Use a cap to protect your head. Wear water-resistant gloves in the icefall and a good pair of down mittens higher up. Carry a spare mitten on your summit attempt.

    Use a heavy down suit for the summit. We wear it already from C2 on the summit attempt in order to save weight. If you choose to do that too, move early in the morning! We have used down suites from both Mountain Hardware and North Face and they all worked well. Check that the hood will work together with the oxygen mask, covering your face properly.
    If possible, bring a spare down suit for cold nights in BC. Bring plenty of light socks for changing.

    Face mask

    Use a heat-exchanging, wired facemask for protection against Khumbu-cough. You should find them in stores for cross-country skiing.

    Harness

    North Face makes a great no-nonsense harness. Remove the stuff that you don’t need. Tie about half a meter of line with a carabiner for the fixed ropes. Forget screw carabiners, you want them big and simple at Everest. Make a knot halfway up the rope and hook up a jumar with another carabiner. Place the jumar on the front side of your backpack or at chest level when not in use, this being the easiest way to get hold of it. Use a repelling device or just a carabiner if you know the technique.

    Ice Axe

    Straight shaft and light. That’s it. We use Camp but there are others around. You will keep the axe on your pack most of the time (until Lhotse Wall and summit).

    <Rope

    We carry a light 15-meter glacier rope at all times. Most people don’t. We bring it for rescue or crossing unsafe places. Or in places of missing ladders and/or fixed ropes. We also tie in to each other if there are no fixed ropes at dangerous sections.

    Tents

    Choose a big, cheap tent for BC. You will need the space and privacy, especially if joining a large expedition.

    There should also be tents at C1, C2, C3 and C4. The C1 tent can double as C3 or C4 tent since you will climb BC to C2 in one go when acclimatized. At all these places you need high quality tents. North Face, Marmot and Mountain Hardware are the dominating brands. Contact the agent in your area and ask for a good price. Getting them for free is difficult since these people are trying to make a living out of this, but buying at wholesale price should be easy in return for a picture or so.

    The agents are also a great source of information about new materials, since they are often high altitude climbers themselves.

    Sleeping bags

    It needs to be down, warm and at least 1000 grams/35 ounce of filling. Don’t go cheap on sleeping bags. You will need two or three of them. One of those can be lighter (for the trek and for BC later in the season).

    Your bag will in a couple of days absorb up to one kilo (2 pound) of your perspiration, affecting both it´s power of insulation and your load. Allow it to dry out on top of your tent every sunny day.

    Pads

    Get a set for each camp. You need double layers in BC and C2 to protect from the stones. If you get cold easily, you might need double layers for the other camps too. ThermaRest works great together with RidgeRest or the like.

    Cooking

    Get a C2 cook, or – if in a small expedition – share one with other people. That will make both you and the sherpas a lot happier. Last expedition we spent 30 days above BC. Tendi, our C2 cook, really helped the sherpas and us to stay in good health. We actually preferred C2 to BC!

    For the high camps, carry two small titan stoves. Working two stoves at once when you are tired really makes a difference. Bring two light pots with lids for C1, those ultimately proceeding to C3 and C4. You could also bring a spare to keep at C3. You need a spoon to eat. Keep a good knife (Leatherman works great) in your pack at all times. Plastic mugs. Don’t forget potholders. These tend to disappear too, so bring two for camp.

    Bring plenty of matches and lighters. Beware, last year we bought 30 lighters in Kathmandu, none worked higher than BC and we still have no clue why! Get the sherpas to shop for the good ones.

    Water purification

    We used Swedish liquid water purification called Aqua Care,
    http://www.aquacare.se.

    It has absolutely no taste and is highly efficient. Put a few drops in cold water and you can drink almost anything. No need for boiling water has really helped us to cut down on gas. The snow around camps is often contaminated by human feces and should always be carefully checked and purified.

    Gas

    Order gas through your trekking agency. If you have a C2 cook you will need about 20-30 normal size cans for your personal climb. The cost is US 7-10 a piece. The trekking agency will provide a large gas container for the C2 cooking tent.

    Maps and compass

    The Washburn map is for sale on the streets of Kathmandu. Bring a small compass. Use it to take a bearing from C4 to the wall when going for the summit. There are no ropes on this section and people have been lost on their way down when clouds or night set in.

    #420237 Hozzászólás

    Pete

    Camp gear

    Camp gear

    Tents

    Choose a big, cheap tent for BC. You will need the space and privacy, especially if joining a large expedition.

    There should also be tents at C1, C2, C3 and C4. The C1 tent can double as C3 or C4 tent since you will climb BC to C2 in one go when acclimatized.

    You will need high quality tents at all high camps. North Face, Marmot and Mountain Hardware are the dominating brands.

    Call the agent in your area and ask for a good price. Getting gear for free is difficult since these people are trying to make a living out of it, but buying at wholesale price should be easy in return for a picture or so.The agents, often high altitude climbers themselves, are also a great source of information about new materials.

    Sleeping bags

    They need to be Down with at least 1000 grams/35 ounce of filling. Don’t go cheap with sleeping bags. You will need two or three of them. One of them can be lighter (for the trek and also for BC later in the season).

    Within just a couple of days, the bag will absorb up to one kilo (2 pound) of your perspiration, this affecting both it´s power of insulation and your load.

    Allow the bag to dry up on top of your tent every sunny day. Secure the bag with rock.

    Pads

    Get a set for each camp. You need double layers in BC and C2 to protect you from the rocks. If you feel cold easily, you might need double layers for the other camps as well. ThermaRest works great together with RidgeRest or the like. No crampons in tent, they´ll puncture the Therma.

    Cooking

    Get a C2 cook, or – if in a small expedition – share one with other people. That will make both you and the sherpas much happier. Past expedition we spent 30 days above BC. Tendi, our C2 cook, really helped the sherpas and us to stay in good health. We actually preferred C2 to BC!

    For the high camps, carry 2 small Titanium burners. Working two stoves when you are tired really makes a difference. Your cooking time will take half the time, allowing you more rest.

    Bring two light pots with lids for C1, those ultimately proceeding to C3 and C4. You could also bring a spare to keep at C3. You need a spoon to eat. Keep a good knife (Leatherman works great) in your pack at all times. Plastic mugs. Don’t forget potholders. These tend to disappear too, so bring two for camp.

    Bring plenty of matches and lighters. Beware, last year we bought 30 lighters in Kathmandu, none worked higher than BC and we still have no clue why! Get the sherpas to shop for the good ones or bring from home.

    Water purification

    We used Swedish liquid water purification called Aqua Care,
    http://www.aquacare.se.

    It has absolutely no taste and is highly efficient. Put a few drops in cold water and you can drink almost anything. No need to boil all water has really helped us to cut down on gas. The snow around camps is often contaminated with human feces and should always be carefully checked and purified. Pour the Aqua care into everything, and make sure that the cooking staff has water bowls with desinfectant in it outside the cooking tent to wash their hands after visits to the bathroom.

    Gas

    Order gas through your trekking agency.
    If you have a C2 cook you will need about 20-30 normal size cans for your personal climb. The cost is US 7-10 per container.

    The trekking agency will provide a large gas container for the C2 cooking tent.

    #420236 Hozzászólás

    Pete

    Majdnem az amit keresel

    ALPINE ASCENTS INTERNATIONAL
    GEAR LIST FOR EVEREST

    Please note: This online gear list is only a guide.

    CLIMBING EQUIPMENT
    [ ] Ice Axe w/leash. General mountaineering tool. Sizing is important: under 5’7″ use a 60cm tool; 5’7″- 6’1″ use a 65cm tool; over 6’1″ use a 70cm tool. (Too short is preferable to too long). Make sure you have a leash that is designed for use on a glacier axe. Please no technical leashes. Suggested: SMC Himalayan or Shuksan, Black Diamond Alpamayo, or Grivel Pamir.
    [ ] Crampons. With “step in” bindings and flat rather than “cookie cutter” frame rails. Suggested: Charlet Moser Super 12 Rapidfix Lanieres, Grivel G12 New-Matic or any 12-point full step-in. Keep in mind that ice specific crampons are for technical ice climbing. These crampons are not recommend for glacier travel.
    [ ] Alpine climbing harness. Harness should fit over all clothing, have gear loops, adjustable leg loops and be reasonably comfortable to hang suspended in. Make sure you can get into the harness without having to step through any part of it. Suggested: Black Diamond Bod Harness or Alpine Bod w/ modifications of adding gear loops made with plastic tubing and cord.
    [ ] Carabiners (4) Locking; (6) Regular. 2 HMS Twistlock & 2 small screwgate lockers; 6 standard ovals recommended.
    [ ] Ascenders (2). Petzls recommended. One right and one left.
    [ ] Rappel device. 1 Figure 8, ATC or Trango Pyramid.
    [ ] Perlon. 40 ft of flexible 6mm.
    [ ] Ski or trekking poles. Optional but highly recommended. Helpful for non-snow covered ascents and descents if you have knee problems. Suggested: Leki Makalu or Smith Approach.

    FOOTWEAR
    [ ] Light hiking boots. Midweight boots, high comfort & good support for hiking.
    [ ] Double Plastic Climbing Boots with Aveolite Liners. Good quality plastic shells with inner boots. Avoid tight fit with heavy socks. Suggested: Koflach Artis Expedition, Scarpa Invernos, or One Sport Everest. One Sport Everest are highly recommended.
    [ ] Fully Insulated Overboots. Suggested: 40 Below K2 Superlight Overboots or Outdoor Research Brooks Rangers. Not needed with One Sport Everest Boots.
    [ ] Gaiters. Suggested: Outdoor Research “Crocodiles” or “Expedition Crocodiles”. Please make sure your gaiters fit around the boot without being to tight around your leg. Gaiters should have cordura on the inside of the leg. No lightweight hiking gaiters.
    [ ] Booties. Polar guard. Optional.
    [ ] Wool or Pile Socks. 4 pair heavyweight wool or synthetic socks (wool is warmer) to be worn over the liner socks. When layering socks, check fit over feet and inside boots. Remember to keep one fresh, dry pair of socks available at all times. It is very important to buy new socks regularly as they lose their cushioning over time. Suggested: Bridgedale, Thorlo, Smartwool, Patagonia. Socks with padded shins are especially nice with plastic boots.
    [ ] Liner Socks. 4 pair of smooth thin wool, nylon or Capilene to be worn next to the skin. This reduces the incidence of blisters and hot-spots and makes the outer sock last longer before needing to be changed. They should fit well with your heavyweight socks.
    [ ] Vapor barrier socks. Optional. Helps reduce moisture buildup in your boots, also keeps you feet a little warmer.
    TECHNICAL CLOTHING
    [ ] Lightweight Underwear. 2-3 pair tops & bottoms, Capilene, other synthetic or wool. No Cotton. Lightweight is preferable as it is more versatile (worn single in warmer conditions and double layer for colder). Zip-T-neck tops allow more ventilation options. One set of white for intense sunny days on the glacier and one pair of dark for faster drying gives the most versatility. Suggested: North Face Micronamics, Marmot DriClime, or Patagonia Capilene. Additional for women: Patagonia Capilita Trunks and Shaka Bra.
    [ ] Expedition Weight Underwear. 1 pair. Expedition weight Capilene. (Alternative: a one-piece suit) Suggested: Feathered Friends Husky Suit.
    [ ] Pile jacket. Heavyweight pile (Polartec 300). A full-zip version is easier to put on and has better ventilation than a pullover. Windstopper fleece is NOT recommended due to reduced breathability. Suggested: North Face Polar Sun or equivalent.
    [ ] Pile pants. Midweight pile (Polartec 200) with full separating side zippers (This is very important for ventilation and for ease of dressing up or down when conditions change in the middle of a climb). Suggested: North Face Denali or equivalent.
    [ ] Down Pants. To fit over insulation layers. Outer shell must be windproof. Suggested: Feathered Friends 40 Below pant.
    [ ] Down Parka. (Fully Baffled, Expedition Weight, must have good hood) Suggested: North Face Baltoro, Marmot 8000meter, or Feathered Friends Rock & Ice.
    [ ] Gore-Tex Shell Pants & Shell Jacket with hood.
    (Bibs recommended) For the jacket we highly recommend a long front zipper, a roomy rather than snug fit and underarm zips which go well below the armpit. We also require full separating side zippers on the pants. Suggested: North Face Mtn. Bib or Mtn. Light Pant, Mtn. Hardware Exposure Bib or Ethereal Pant.

    MITTS & GLOVES
    [ ] 2 Pair Synthetic gloves. Bunting or fleece gloves which will fit comfortably inside mitts. A heavier fleece will do a better job of keeping hands warmer when wet than lighter polypropylene or Capilene. Suggested: North Face or Patagonia. If you can find gloves that are comfortably worn together you will be the happiest.
    [ ] 2 Pair Pile Mitts and Gore-Tex Overmitts. Outdoor Pro Modular Mitts w/double liners are required. Extra pair should be big enough so that gloves fit inside pile liners. You will want to have three layers total in the mitts.

    HEADWEAR
    [ ] Headlamp. Bring plenty of spare bulbs & batteries. Halogen bulbs are not necessary. Suggested: Petzl Zoom or Princeton Tec.
    [ ] Glacier glasses with Side Covers. 100% UV, IR, high quality optical lenses designed for mountain use, must have side covers, leashes, and a nose guard is particularly helpful (Chums MelaNoNo is a good brand). No more than 8% light transmission. Suggested: Bolle, Bucci, Julbo Round “Arc”or Cebe. If you wear contact lenses we recommend packing a spare pair of glasses-it is a good idea to have these with “photo-gray” or equivalent light-sensitive material so they can double as emergency sunglasses. If you wear glasses we recommend prescription glacier glasses (gray or amber). Talk to your eye care professional to find out where prescription glacier glasses are available. Regular sunglasses are not dark enough and do not provide any side protection from the sun. For prescription Glacier Glasses, contact Black Diamond (801) 278-5533 or Opticus
    [ ] Ski Goggles, 1 pair. 100% UV & IR. Bolle’s Chrono work well. Climbers with glasses try X-700, they fit over glasses.
    [ ] Balaclava (1) Heavyweight, (1) Lightweight. Suggested: North Face. Heavyweight. Must fit over lightweight
    [ ] Warm pile/wool hat.
    [ ] Baseball cap or other sun hat. One with a good visor to shade the nose and eyes.
    [ ] 2 Bandanas. Used to shade your neck.
    [ ] Neoprene face mask. Optional

    PERSONAL EQUIPMENT
    [ ] Backpack. Internal frame pack 6,000 cu.in. Keep it simple and light, avoid unnecessary zippers, etc which add weight. You will need crampon and ice tool attachment points.
    [ ] Daypack. For the trek. 3,000 cu. in.
    [ ] Sleeping Bag. (Expedition quality rated to at least -300F). Goose down preferred over synthetic for bulk & weight. If well-cared-for a down bag will last much longer than a synthetic bag. Your bag needs to be long enough that your feet are not pressing out the foot box which will make you colder. It should be roomy enough for comfortable sleeping but snug enough for efficient heat retention. Suggested: North Face Inferno, Feathered Friends Snow Goose, or Marmot CWM.
    [ ] One Therma-Rest pad. One 3/4 or full length Therma-Rest pad. If you are over 6′ a long is recommended. Make sure to include a valve stem and patch repair kit for your Therma-Rest. Suggested: Cascade Designs Therma-Rest Guide Light model
    [ ] One Closed-Cell foam pad. Full length closed cell is recommended. Suggested: Cascade Designs Ridge-Rest
    [ ] Small personal first-aid kit. (Simple and Light) Aspirin, Moleskin, molefoam, waterproof first-aid tape, athletic tape, Band-Aids, personal medications, etc. The guides will have extensive first-aid kits, so leave anything extra behind. Please let your guide know about any medical issues before the climb.
    [ ] Cooking Gear:
    Cup: 16oz. plastic insulated mug with snap-on lid (retains heat well and is spill-resistant in the tent). Some prefer a non- insulated mug for warming hands.
    Spoon: Good quality tough plastic (lexan).
    Bowl: Deep plastic with 2-3 cup capacity with lid.
    [ ] Sunscreen. SPF 40 or better, 2 small tubes. Please note: Sunscreen older than 6 months loses half of its SPF rating, make sure that you have new sunscreen. Suggested: Dermatone or AloeGator.
    [ ] Lipscreen. SPF 40 or better, at least 2 sticks. Make sure your lipscreen is new. Suggested: Dermatone or Banana Boat.
    [ ] Water bottles: 2 liters minimum capacity. We recommend
    One 1.5 liter & One .5 liter wide-mouth. Hunnersdorf are recommended (they withstand temperature extremes and abuse much better than Nalgene), if you can not find Hunnersdorf bottles, No water bags or bladder systems.
    [ ] Toiletry bag. Include toilet paper.
    [ ] Pee Bottle (1 Liter). Large mouth, clearly marked water bottle.
    [ ] Pee Funnel (for women). It is a good idea to practice, practice, practice. Suggested: Freshette.
    [ ] Swiss Army knife. Medium sized. Keep the knife simple. Suggested: Swiss Army Super Tinker.
    [ ] 1 Liter Thermos. Needs to be strong. Stainless Steel Vacuum bottle. Suggested: Outdoor Research.
    [ ] 2 Lighters. We recommend two disposable, adjustable lighters, rather than matches, for lighting stoves. Make sure the lighters are new and full of fuel.
    [ ] 4 Trash Compactor bags. To line stuff sacks to keep gear dry & one large enough to line pack. Trash Compactor bags are made from a heavier plastic.
    [ ] Camera gear. Optional. We recommend a small instant or point and shoot cameras. Please do not bring large SLR cameras with extra lenses. For the best pictures bring slow speed film, 50, 100, or 200. Simple and light. Disposable cameras also work well.
    [ ] Travel clothes.
    [ ] 2 Large duffle bags with lock. Used for transporting your gear.
    [ ] Compression Stuff Sacks work well for reducing volume Especially for sleeping bags and clothing.

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